Montessori Philosophy

“The most important period of life is not the age of university
studies but the period from birth to age six.”

Philosophy

Dr. Maria Montessori’s approach is respect for the child as a worthy individual, occupied with the task of developing himself/herself into a mature human adult. She observed children’s need for independence, for self-confidence as adequate people, for control over their own impulses and emotions as well as a natural curiosity and desire to learn.

She observed in young children a phenomenon she called the “absorbent mind”. Children can absorb information from their surroundings without any conscious, tedious effort. Learning does not have to be forced upon them. If the environment is orderly and readily accessible and if the children are free to work through their own cycles of activity at their own pace, they can learn to read, write and calculate in the same natural way that they learned to walk and talk.

Dr. Montessori wrote,

‘’The most important period of life is not the age of university studies but the period from birth to age six.

This indicates the importance of early development. Children mature at very different rates and their periods of readiness for academic subjects vary greatly. The Montessori classroom allows each child the freedom to select activities which correspond to his or her own periods of interest and readiness. Some children begin to read and calculate at a very early age. Maria Montessori’s objective was that the learning experience should occur naturally and joyfully at the proper moment for each individual child.